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Herbivores

BRAZILIAN TAPIR

Conservation status

Vulnerable

Life span

20 to 30 years in the wild and 30+ in captivity

Height

1.7 – 2 m (5.5 – 6.5 ft)

Length

.

Weight

150 - 250 kg

Native habitat

Rainforests and wet open forests, preferably near rivers and swamps in South America.

Diet

Herbivore

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Tapirus terrestris

INTERESTING FACT

The Brazilian tapir is dark brown, paler in the face, and has a low, erect crest running from the crown down the back of the neck.  On some Brazilian tapirs, the crest is a darker brown or black, whereas on others it is lighter in color. They prefer to live close to water, especially rivers.They are excellent swimmers and divers. The tapir's short, fleshy, trunk-like nose helps to sniff its way through the forest and is a sensitive 'finger' used to pull leaves and shoots towards its mouth. This prehensile snout also makes a great snorkel when the tapirs are bathing. Tapirs are related to the horse and rhinoceros, not the pig. Brazilian tapirs have limited eyesight. A single youngster is born after a gestation of around 380 days (12.5 months). Baby tapirs have striped and spotted coats for camouflage, but they lose their patterns as they grow older. 

CONSERVATION MESSAGE

The biggest threats to the population of this Vulnerable species are hunting, competition with livestock as well as deforestation, leading to loss of their natural habitat. Conservation efforts such as assessing the Conservation Status and population monitoring, participative camera trapping, tapir research and conservation programs, tapir action Plans, catalyzing habitat conservation, environmental education, communication, training, and capacity building, and scientific tourism initiatives are ongoing to conserve Brazilian tapirs.

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